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History Lessons for the National History Curriculum
at Years 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10.

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The Story of Australia - History Projects are interactive computer based teaching and learning resources that provide students with the necessary historical knowledge, understanding and skills required to fully meet the Achievement Standards of the National History Curriculum at Years 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10.

The program provides a valuable resource for busy teachers who may not necessarily have trained as historians, taking the hard work out of researching multiple complex periods of Australian history.

 

For a Demonstration, please watch the video below.
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Select from the list below to view details about each title...

School Prices

$50.00 per Volume with a single computer site licence
$100.00 per Volume with an unlimited site licence

Complete set of 16 Volumes with a single user site licence provided on one DVD Rom - $400
Complete set of 16 Volumes with an unlimited site licence provided on one DVD Rom - $800

(An unlimited site licence allows installation on a server network and/or any number of computers within the school, including personal computers of enrolled students, and allows students to retain, and/or burn to disk, a working copy of their project for their personal record.)

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The Story of Australia - History Projects
Operating System
Special Instructions

 

About This Program

The Story of Australia - History Projects is centred around a 16 volume series of audio visual narratives that give a broad overview of early Australian history, from the arrival of the ancient Aboriginal People, to the visits of the early Dutch navigators, the discovery and colonisation of the great southland by the British and the federation of those colonies into the nation of Australia. We learn of the early years of the new nation and its involvement in the First World War, followed by the effects of the Great Depression on Australia and Australia's participation in the Second World War.

(see below for information about the National History Curriculum, and for a Mapping Table that shows the relationship of each History Project to the appropriate year level of the National History Curriculum)

Rationale

The National History Curriculum recommends the use of 'story' as a key strategy for developing young people's historical thinking. Research shows that learners grapple with the past in much the same way as historians, making sense of it by analysing, ordering and linking events in storied form, and that in many situations students learn best by ‘doing’, providing they are first provided with meaningful and appropriate learning content.

The Story of Australia - History Projects allow students to experience the story in Australia’s fascinating history, and encourages them to become involved as participants in the study of Australian history, by 'doing' and 'making' history using historical methods and procedures in a manner that resembles the historian's craft.

The History Projects introduce students to the process of learning about and understanding the stories and situations which were a part of everyday life experiences in years past, and asks them to reflect on how these stories mesh together to form the Australia we know today. 

By becoming a part of the narrative and immersing themselves in the process of inquiry they can create a powerful learning journey for themselves. 

The Audio Visual Narratives

The Story of Australia - History Projects are centred on a series of 16 audio-visual narratives that are 12 to 15 minutes in length.

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The narratives provide a broad overview of Australian history in chronological order, from the arrival and settlement of the ancient Aboriginal People, to the end of the Second World War.
Each story is illustrated with around 75 to 100 artwork images that depict what is being stated in the narrative.
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The stories are dramatically told in child appropriate language that can be readily understood by middle and upper primary age students.
The narratives allow students to experience the story in Australia’s fascinating history, and develops their curiosity, imagination and historical understanding.

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To view an example of the narratives, watch The Reign of Rum Demonstration video below.

Student Lessons and Projects

The Story of Australia History Projects contain easy to use project resources and interactive lessons that develop student’s historical knowledge, understanding and skills. The broad scope of the associated activities allows teachers to utilise cross curriculum approaches, drawing in general capabilities including literacy, ethical behaviour, intercultural understanding and critical and creative thinking.

Replacing Program Images

The history projects challenge learners to create their own versions of the Story of Australia narratives by replacing all, or any, of the drawings in the original programs with images that they have either drawn or painted themselves, or those that they have searched for and chosen as replacements that best illustrate that section of the story.
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The process of selecting and inserting the images into the programs introduces students to the use of historical methods and procedures, focusing on the interpretation of evidence and the use of narratives to construct accounts of the past. The selection and management of images makes students part of the story telling process and helps support the process of being an active participant in historical research.

The search for and selection of the images helps in developing student’s research skills and exercises their critical thinking, and helps them learn how to reason historically with content and to understand that historical accounts and illustrations of the past may differ or conflict because people select and use evidence in different ways for different purposes.

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To view a demonstration of how the images are imported into the program, watch the Image Import Demonstration video below.


For a demonstration of the impact that the imported images have on the meaning of the story and on how it is perceive by viewers, watch The Reign of Rum Demonstration video below, which uses imported images in place of the original drawings.

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The lessons and associated activities develop student ICT capabilities. They allow them to use a range of communication forms as well as to work closely with digital technology to complete the project tasks.
Through this process of engagement, students are able to grapple with the key questions, master historical research skills and build a solid foundation of historical knowledge.

Easy Setup and Operation

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The replacement of the original images with those of their own choosing is a very easy process. Students can obtain the images from a number of sources, such as the school library and the internet, from which they can download images directly into the program, or they can create their own drawings or paintings that depict their personal interpretations of what is being stated in the narrative and insert them into the project.
When images are loaded into the program, their names will appear in the Image List in the Import menu of the program. When an image is selected, a thumbnail of the image appears in the viewer window, and when the Import button is clicked, the program imports the image and automatically re sizes it to fit the viewing window. The imported images are saved when the program is quit and the new images will be used when the program is reopened and played.
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Historical Questions and Research

Each image of the History Projects has an accompanying "Notes and Assessment" page, which assists learners to develop patterns of historical reasoning by encouraging them to ask questions, foster debate, use evidence to support a position and, understanding that historical and literary dimensions of students' learning are complementary, to communicate that position effectively.

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The"Notes and Assessment" pages encourage students to analyse and make judgements regarding the plausibility of the script for that frame of the story, and analyse and make judgements regarding how well the original drawings and imported images depict what is stated in the script, and determine the types of evidence the imported images represent, and to give the reasons for their assessments in writing.

Teachers’ Assessment

Each narrative contains an Assessment Page where teachers can communicate with the students while they are working on a project or lesson and offer guidance and constructive criticisms if required, and where they can provide an assessment of the student’s work on completion. Each assessment session is automatically dated and saved and can be exported as a text file or printed for archival purposes.

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For a demonstration of the Notes and Assessment page, watch the Notes and Assessment video below.

Record of Achievement

The completion of a projects gives students a feeling of accomplishment and builds a sense of pride in their achievement. Due to the powerful impact that the images have on the meaning of the story and on how it is perceived by viewers, the completed project creates an audio-visual narrative that gives the student’s personal interpretation of an important period in Australia’s history.

With the unlimited site licence version of the program, students can load the program onto their personal computers and work on it from there. Then, on completion of the program, students can burn a copy to CD-ROM for a permanent record of their accomplishment.

Easy Program Setup and Operation

A great deal of discretion is given to the teacher as to how they use the program. The History Projects can be used by individual students, with each student working on their own project, or by students working together in small groups, or by the entire class working on one project.

Teachers can choose to just play the stories to give students a broad overview of Australian history, or they can use an entire narrative as a depth study, or select a chapter, or chapters, of the narrative and use them as the lesson. Whichever method is used, all of the student activities and teacher assessments will function equally well.

The History Projects have easy to follow tutorials that guide you through the simple process of setting up and working on a new project.  A new project is started by simply copying it from the CD-ROM and pasting it onto your computer, or onto a flash drive that is connected to your computer.  The copied programs contain all the functions that are required for the student’s operation and the teacher’s assessment of a project.
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Mapping Table

This mapping table shows the relationship of each History Project to the appropriate year level, and the key content areas covered. This is highly useful for teachers in multi-level classes who may be required to teach content within a class at two or more different year levels.

Program Volume

Year Levels

Key Content Areas

Volume 1
Discovery

Year 4
Year 9

The arrival and settlement of the ancient Aboriginal People;
the visits of the early Dutch navigators;
Abel Tasman and his discovery of Van Dieman’s Land;
James Cook and the scientific expedition to Tahiti;
the search for the Great Southland;
the discovery of the eastern coast of New Holland;
Botany Bay and the Great Barrier Reef;
the voyage home by way of Java.

Volume 2
The First Fleet

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

Agrarian Revolution and the overcrowded cities of Britain;
petty crime and the harsh laws that were passed;
Britain's need of a dumping place for convicts;
the decision to establish a convict settlement in New Holland;
the appointment of Arthur Phillip as Governor;
the preparation of the First Fleet;
the long voyage to Botany Bay;
the decision to move the settlement to Port Jackson;
difficulties encountered in the establishment of the colony.

Volume 3
Convicts

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The harsh British laws of the late 1700s;
types of convicts transported to Australia;
the appalling conditions on board the convict ships;
the difficulty in growing crops in the new colony;
rationing of food and measures used to discourage stealing;
attempts by convicts to escape and the dangers they faced;
the often violent contact with the Aboriginal People;
harsh justice and the punishments applied for offences;
the "ticket-of-leave" system.

Volume 4
The Reign of Rum

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The arrival of the New South Wales Corps in 1790;
John Macarthur and the corrupt activities of the Corps;
how rum became the currency of the colony;
the terms of Governors Hunter and King;
Governor Bligh and his arrest by the New South Wales Corps;
the arrival of Governor Macquarie.

Volume 5
The Macquarie Years

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

Progress in the colony;
the architect Francis Greenway;
the crossing of the Blue Mountains;
the emancipists and the exclusives;
Marsden, Macarthur and Bigge;
Governor Macquarie’s resignation.

Volume 6
The Early Explorers

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

Exploration under Governors Brisbane and Darling;
John Oxley’s exploration of the Brisbane River;
Hume and Hovell’s expedition to Port Phillip Bay;
Allan Cunningham’s discovery of the Darling Downs;
Charles Sturt’s expeditions to chart the Macquarie and Murrumbidgee Rivers;
Thomas Mitchell’s expeditions to prove Sturt wrong;
violent contact with the Aboriginal People;
Mitchell’s discovery of Australia Felix.

Volume 7
The Squatters

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

Governor Darling’s “Limits of Location”;
Governor Bourke and the legalisation of Squatting;
the process of squatting on the land;
the Squatter's life, the building of a slab hut home, the squatters diet and the isolation of living in the bush;
the tragedy of prolonged drought, bushfires and floods;
the often violent contact with the Aboriginal People;
the decimation of Aboriginal People by European diseases and alcohol;
the 1840’s recession and recovery.

Volume 8
The New Colonies

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The establishment of new colonies in Hobart and Launceston;
the settlement of Port Phillip Bay by the Henty family and John Batman;
contacts with the Aboriginal People;
the establishment of Melbourne;
Brisbane and the Moreton Bay Penal Colony;
Governor Stirling and the Swan River Colony;
wars with the Aboriginal People;
Colonel William Light and the founding of Adelaide.

Volume 9
The Great Gold Rush

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The discovery of gold in Australia by Edward Hargraves;
gold strikes in Victoria at Ballarat and Bendigo;
transportation in the goldfields and the start of Cobb and Co.;
the mining methods used to extract the gold;
the Chinese miners and the 'White Australia Policy';
the government licence fee system;
Peter Lalor and the Eureka Stockade.

Volume 10
The Bushrangers

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The early escaped convict bushrangers;
Tasmanian bushrangers and the declaration of martial law;
gold bandits, Frank Gardiner, Johnny Gilbert and Ben Hall;
'Black' Dan Morgan;
Frederick Ward;
Ned Kelly and the Kelly Gang;
the Jerilderie hold-up;
the capture of Ned Kelly at Glenrowan.

Volume 11
The Inland Explorers

Year 4
Year 5
Year 9

The growth and expansion of Australia during the 1860’s;
explorers began to investigate the centre of the continent;
the explorers contact with the Aboriginal People;
Edward John Eyre and his expedition to Western Australia;
Charles Sturt and his search for an inland sea;
the explorers Ludwig Leichhard, John McDouall Stuart, the Forrest Brothers and Ernest Giles;
the disastrous expedition of Burke and Wills.

Volume 12
Federation

Year 5
Year 6
Year 9

Colonial Australia in the 1890’s;
tariffs, depression, industrial unrest;
the labour movement;
Australian nationalism;
Sir Henry Parkes and the federation debate;
Australia’s involvement in the Boer War;
Edmund Barton and the push for an English style Parliamentary Government;
the Western Australia gold strike;
Nationhood.

Volume 13
The Innocent Years
Year 6
Year 9
Year 10
Australia’s White Australia Policy;
the Kanakas;
automobiles and aircraft;
sport and recreation;
the capital city controversy;
the selection of Canberra as the site for the federal capital;
the threat of war.
Volume 14
The Anzacs

Year 6
Year 9
Year 10

The outbreak of war in Europe;
Australia rallies to England's aid;
early enthusiasm and enlistment;
the first contingent;
the "Emden" sunk;
Gallipoli;
the conscription debate;
Middle East campaign;
the French trenches;
armistice and evaluation.
Volume 15
The Great Depression
Year 6
Year 10
Australia between the wars;
the first flight from Europe;
the birth of Qantas;
the Flying Doctor Service;
Kingsford Smith;
Hughes and Bruce;
the cause and effect of the great depression;
recovery from depression;
the threat of war.
Volume 16
The Second World War
Year 6
Year 10
The German invasion of Poland;
Australia’s entry into the war;
Curtin's rise to power;
the Japanese invasion;
MacArthur and the American alliance;
Tobruk;
the invasion of Australia;
the Kokoda Trail;
Curtin's death;
hostilities end.

The National History Curriculum

See below for a link to The Australian History Curriculum site, and a list of the key inquiry questions for years 4,5,6,9 and 10, and a Mapping Table that shows the relationship of each History Project to the appropriate year level of the National History Curriculum and gives the key content areas covered.

ACARA, The Australian Curriculum History web site, http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10#level=4

At each year level of the national curriculum, there are a series of key inquiry questions that provide a focus and direction for the historical skills, knowledge and understanding of history for that year, and the Achievement Standards for that year.
At Year 4 - First Contacts, the key inquiry questions are:
  1. Why did the great journeys of exploration occur?

  2. What was life like for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples before the arrival of the Europeans?

  3. Why did the Europeans settle in Australia?

  4. What was the nature and consequence of contact between Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples and early traders, explorers and settlers?

Year 4 Achievement Standard
By the end of Year 4, students explain how and why life changed in the past, and identify aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the experiences of an individual or group over time. They recognise the significance of events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates. They pose a range of questions about the past. They identify sources (written, physical, visual, oral), and locate information to answer these questions. They recognise different points of view. Students develop and present texts, including narratives, using historical terms.

At Year 5 - The Australian Colonies, the key inquiry questions are:
  1. What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?

  2. How did an Australian colony develop over time and why?

  3. How did colonial settlement change the environment?

  4. What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students identify the causes and effects of change on particular communities, and describe aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. They describe the significance of people and events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and record information related to this inquiry. They examine sources to identify points of view. Students develop, organise and present their texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, using historical terms and concepts.

At Year 6 - Australia as a Nation, the key inquiry questions are:
  1. Why and how did Australia become a nation?

  2. How did Australian society change throughout the twentieth century?

  3. Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come?

  4. What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society?

Year 6 Achievement Standard
By the end of Year 6, students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on society. They compare the different experiences of people in the past. They explain the significance of an individual and group.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and compare information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to identify and describe points of view. Students develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their information, they use historical terms and concepts and incorporate relevant sources.

At Year 9 - The Making of the Modern World, the key inquiry questions are:
  1. What were the changing features of the movements of people from 1750 to 1918?

  2. How did new ideas and technological developments contribute to change in this period?

  3. What was the origin, development, significance and long-term impact of imperialism in this period?

  4. What was the significance of World War I?

Year 9 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 9, students refer to key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgments about their importance. They explain the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of these events and developments over the short and long term. They explain different interpretations of the past.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration. When researching, students develop different kinds of questions to frame an historical inquiry. They interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students examine sources to compare different points of view. When evaluating these sources, they analyse origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They develop their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical interpretations. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their conclusions, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

At Year 10 - The Modern World and Australia, the key inquiry questions are:
  1. How did the nature of global conflict change during the twentieth century?

  2. What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world?

  3. How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period?

Year 10 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame an historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose, and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.